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Sep 6, 2016 3:42 PMPublication: The East Hampton Press

Storm Uncovers Sandbags On Montauk's Beach Project

People survey the damage along Montauk’s shoreline this week following the remnants of Hurricane Hermine. KYRIL BROMLEY
Sep 6, 2016 3:56 PM

Storm waves from the remnants of Hurricane Hermine scoured away thousands of tons of sand from atop a sandbag revetment constructed by the Army Corps of Engineers in Montauk last winter, exposing some of the sandbags in one small section of beach and leaving steep scarps in the manufactured artificial dune covering the rest.

The most severe erosion occurred in a section of the beach just west of South Edison Street, in front of the Royal Atlantic Hotel. In that area, two layers of the more than 13,000 sandbags that were laid along 3,100 feet of beachfront were exposed, though most of the large sand berm atop them remained intact.

For an approximately 500-foot section of the shoreline, the sand berm was steeply eroded on its leading edge, creating a cliff of sand where the berm had once extended 20 feet or more seaward.

To the east and west of the badly eroded section, the sand berm atop the revetment seemed to fend off the advancing waves while maintaining the gradually sloping shape of the artificial dune that was constructed above the sandbags.

At the western terminus, where protesters had stood in the way of bulldozers in the trench being dug to make way for the revetments last fall, resulting in several arrests, the artificial dune and lines of planted beach grass sprouts surrounded by snow fencing, appeared largely unscathed on Tuesday morning.

“We’ve documented the conditions there over the last three days with photos and sent that information to the state DEC and the Army Corps,” Supervisor Larry Cantwell said. “If nothing else, it speaks to the inadequacy of the work that’s been done and the need for a major beach fill that is needed there.”

Mr. Cantwell and the Town Board were blasted by Montauk residents and environmentalists as the project took shape last year, and were blamed for allowing the project to proceed. Board members defended themselves saying that the project would be a stop-gap to protect oceanfront properties until a more substantial reconstruction of the beachhead across all of downtown Montauk could be undertaken with, they presumed, money from hundreds of millions in federal funding for storm resiliency after Superstorm Sandy. But when the federal work plan was released last month, the Army Corps only proposed adding small stabilizing amounts of sand to the existing project.

The agreements that paved the way for the revetment to be constructed would have the Army Corps repair any damage to the berm or revetment in the event of a severe storm emergency but leave the responsibility to truck in more sand to repair the berm covering the revetment from small events to the town and Suffolk County.

Mr. Cantwell said that there is no time frame or deadline for the town repairing the berm and that the course of action will be discussed in the coming days.

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Oh doesn't that beach look inviting:(
By sandydog21 (195), Southampton on Sep 6, 16 4:49 PM
Quote:

"Board members defended themselves saying that the project would be a stop-gap to protect oceanfront properties until a more substantial reconstruction of the beachhead across all of downtown Montauk could be undertaken with, they presumed, money from hundreds of millions in federal funding for storm resiliency after Superstorm Sandy. But when the federal work plan was released last month, the Army Corps only proposed adding small stabilizing amounts of sand to the existing project."
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A ...more
By highhatsize (4217), East Quogue on Sep 6, 16 6:38 PM
1 member liked this comment
A picture is worth a thousand words. Wow, that did not last long, did it? David Buda
By davbud (127), east hampton on Sep 6, 16 7:32 PM
2 members liked this comment
A picture is worth a thousand words. Wow, that did not last long, did it? David Buda
By davbud (127), east hampton on Sep 6, 16 7:32 PM
Some day soon lake montauk will be brackish
By dave h (193), calverton on Sep 6, 16 7:50 PM
Do you mean Fort Pond?
By dobbsjerry (3), MONTAUK on Sep 7, 16 9:33 AM
That's it more money! That will fix it! Highhatsize...you are part of the problem. I'm sure you think gun free zones are the answers to all our mass shouting problems too.
By capt. Jack (17), Southampton on Sep 6, 16 8:32 PM
Thank you for your utterly useless comment here. You're doing a great job helping to facilitate a dialogue on shoreline management / erosion / spending /planning.

You are a true citizen of the community. If you can spare the time, please run for office and share more of your exceptional ideas with us. I look forward to your thoughtful and innovative ideas to help us progress through the issues facing the area at large.
By dogfacejones (81), Southampton on Sep 6, 16 9:33 PM
2 members liked this comment
Shooting
By capt. Jack (17), Southampton on Sep 6, 16 8:35 PM
gun free zones = fun free zones!
By dogfacejones (81), Southampton on Sep 6, 16 9:35 PM
As predicted years ago by many here, the sandbags are now in essence new "hardened structures" which will start a new cycle of erosion to the west, as the littoral current scours out the dunes, which has clearly started already in the photos.

You can't mess with Mother Nature.

For every action there is an equal and opposite reaction.

With ocean levels rising [WHATEVER
By PBR (4956), Southampton on Sep 7, 16 3:25 AM
With ocean levels rising -- WHATEVER the cause -- the only logical long-term solution is to bulkhead/harden all of Long Island's shoreline.

Yes you read that right.

The only logical long-term solution.

Yes -- very expensive.

Or keep applying Bandaids . . .
By PBR (4956), Southampton on Sep 7, 16 3:29 AM
Shore hardening structure accelerates erosion both in front of said structure and down drift-FACT. While pitting sand on an eroded stretch of beach is just a band aid, it will not be detrimental to the long term stability of that beach.
By bigfresh (4666), north sea on Sep 7, 16 6:57 AM
Wait, you mean the same people that built the New Orleans levies have no clue how to ''manage'' coastal areas of the south shore? huh. shocker.
By SlimeAlive (1181), Southampton on Sep 7, 16 7:18 AM
The sand bags literally did what they were supposed to. The whole point of the project was to put something in place that could handle the power of a storm until the entire dune could be rebuilt. Without this work having been done, it's very likely that this storm would have undermined some structures along the coast.

Whenever a storm erodes sand that's been placed on the beach people point and say "what a waste of money!". No, it's not a waste. It's doing exactly what it was designed ...more
By Nature (2966), Southampton on Sep 7, 16 9:26 AM
2 members liked this comment
The only places that are still intact are the ones that have beach grasses - SO obvious that by planting the grasses the beach will remain intact - Hey - Please look at the photo!
By Vikki K (490), Southampton on Sep 8, 16 12:17 PM